A friend and ex-colleague Francis Irving (@frabcus on Twitter) has recently been on a bit of an anti C/C++ kick, including tweeting about the problems which happen in software written in so called "insecure" languages, and culminating in his promise website which boldly calls for people to promise to not use C/C++ for new projects.

Recently I've not been programming enough. I'm still a member of the NetSurf browser project, and I'm still (slowly) working on Gitano from time to time. I am still (in theory) an upstream on the Cherokee Webserver project (and I really do need to sit down and fix some bugs in logging) and any number of smaller projects as well. I am still part of Debian and would like to start making positive contributions beyond voting and egging others on, but I have been somewhat burned out by everything going on in my life, including both home and work. While I am hardly in any kind of mental trouble, I've simply not had any tuits of late.

I find it very hard to make public promises which I know I am going to break. Francis suggested that the promise can be broken which while it might not devalue it for him (or you) it does for me. I do however think that public promises are a good thing, especially when they foster useful discussion in the communities I am part of, so from that point of view I very much support Francis in his efforts.

Even given all of the above, I'd like to make a promise statement of my own. I'd like to make it in public and hopefully that'll help me to keep it. I know I could easily fail to live up to this promise, but I'm hoping I'll do well and to some extent I'm relying on all you out there to help me keep it. Given we're almost at the end of the month, I am making the promise now and I want it to take effect starting on the 1st of February 2015.

I hereby promise that I will do better at contributing to all the projects I am nominally part of, making at least one useful material contribution to at least one project every week. I also promise to be more mindful of the choices I make when choosing how to implement solutions to problems, selecting appropriate languages and giving full consideration to how my solution might be attacked if appropriate.

I can't and won't promise not to use C/C++ but if you honestly feel you can make that promise, then I'm certain Francis would love for you to head over to his promise website and pledge. Also regardless of your opinions, please do join in the conversation, particularly regarding being mindful of attack vectors whenever you write something.