As some of you may know, I have been working on a small hardware project called the Beer'o'Meter whose purpose is to allow us to extend Ye Olde Vic's beer board to indicate the approximate fullness of each cask. For some time now, we've been operating an electronic beer board at the Vic which you may see tweeted out from time to time. The pumpotron has become very popular with the visitors to the pub, especially that it can be viewed online in a basic textual form.

Of course, as many of you who visit pubs know only too well. That a beer is "on" is no indication of whether or not you need to get there sharpish to have a pint, or if you can take your time and have a curry first. As a result, some of us have noticed a particular beer on, come to the pub after dinner, and then been very sad that if only we'd come 30 minutes previously, we'd have had a chance at the very beer we were excited about.

Combine this kind of sadness with a two week break at Christmas, and I started to develop a Beer'o'Meter to extend the pumpotron with an indication of how much of a given beer had already been served. Recently my boards came back from Elecrow along with various bits and bobs, and I have spent some time today building one up for test purposes.

As always, it's important to start with some prep work to collect all the necessary components. I like to use cake cases as you may have noticed on the posting yesterday about the oscilloscope I built.

Component prep for the Beer'o'Meter

Naturally, after prep comes the various stages of assembly. You start with the lowest-height components, so here's the board after I fitted the ceramic capacitors:

Step 1, ceramic capacitors

And here's after I fitted the lying-down electrolytic decoupling capacitor for the 3.3 volt line:

Step 2, capacitors which lie down

Next I should have fitted the six transitors from the middle cake case, but I discovered that I'd used the wrong pinout for them. Even after weeks of verification by myself and others, I'd made a mistake. My good friend Vincent Sanders recently posted about how creativity is allowing yourself to make mistakes and here I had made a doozy I hadn't spotted until I tried to assemble the board. Fortunately TO-92 transistors have nice long legs and I have a pair of tweezers and some electrical tape. As such I soon had six transistors doing the river dance:

Transistors doing the river-dance

With that done, I noticed that the transistors now stood taller than the pins (previously I had been intending to fit the transistors before the pins) so I had to shuffle things around and fit all my 0.1" pins and sockets next:

Step 3, pins and sockets

Then I could fit my dancing transistors:

Step 4, transistors

We're almost finished now, just one more capacitor to provide some input decoupling on the 9v power supply:

Finished -- decoupling fitted

Of course, it wouldn't be complete without the ESP8266Huzzah I acquired from AdaFruit though I have to say that I'm unlikely to use these again, but rather I might design in the surface-mount version of the module instead.

Fitted with the module

And since this is the very first Beer'o'Meter to be made, I had to go and put a 1 on the serial-number space on the back of the board. I then tried to sign my name in the box, made a hash of it, so scribbled in the gap :-)

The back of the finished module

Finally I got to fit all six of my flow meters ready for some testing. I may post again about testing the unit, but for now, here's a big spider of a flow meter for beer:

The Beer'o'Meter spider

This has been quite a learning experience for me, and I hope in the future to be able to share more of my hardware projects, perhaps from an earlier stage.

I have plans for a DAC board, and perhaps some other things.